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Romans 12 & 13

Romans 12-13

In preparing for this week's sermon, I came across a series of questions that started with the phrase "Which one bothered you more?" They were very convicting to me and I thought I would share them with you. Here they are in order: 1. Which one bothered you more: "A soul lost in Hell or a scratch on your new car?" 2. Which one bothered you more: "Missing the morning wors...

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Romans 14-16

Romans 14-16

Several years ago, a popular Christian blogger asked his audience to tell him what their churches were fighting over today. It was a simple request but, to his surprise, "the Twitter survey blew up." He received thousands of replies, and here are a few of the ones that caught his attention: - their churches are fighting over the length of the worship pastor's beard- their...

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Romans 10 & 11

Romans 10 & 11

Neil Marten, a member of the British Parliament, was once giving a tour of the House of Parliament to some friends when they came across Lord Hailsham, a leading figure in the government. Hailsham immediately recognized Marten in the group and cried out in a loud voice "Neil!" Not daring to disobey the command, the entire group of visitors promptly fell to their knees. Th...

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Romans 9

Romans 9

Frederick Lehman was a German immigrant who moved to America when he was four years old. At the age of eleven, he became a Christian and went on to study for the ministry and pastor several churches in Iowa, Indiana, and Missouri. He also wrote hundreds of Gospel songs, the most famous being "The Love of God." The first verse and the chorus say this: The love of God is ...

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1 Corinthians 15

Easter Weekend

Throughout the centuries, there have been several theories used to disprove the resurrection of Jesus Christ. These include the swoon theory, the theft theory, and the wrong tomb theory. There has also been the magician theory, the hallucination theory, and the twin theory (the idea that Jesus had a twin brother who was crucified). One of the most interesting ones was the ...

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Romans 8

Romans 8

During the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge, no protective devices were used. 23 men fell to their deaths. As a result, the work slowed down until the contractors decided to put in a safety net. After several weeks, the net saved 10 lives, and the work increased by 25%. Why? Because the men felt safe. They knew that something was there to catch them. Paul alludes to...

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Romans 7

Romans 7

In the 5th Century, a monk named Benedict of Nursia struggled tremendously with sin. Try as he might, he just could not get victory over it. He went so far as to wear a rough hair shirt and live for three years in a desolate cave where his food was lowered to him by a cord. At another time, he threw himself into a thorn bush, only to come out bloody and beaten up, but it d...

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Psalm 51

Psalm 51

What does it mean to confess your sin? Many years ago, a king named David stayed behind when his people went off to war. As he did so, he saw a beautiful woman bathing and he slept with her. She was married to another man. She became pregnant with child. This greatly concerned David, so he had her husband killed and he married her. Problem solved, right? No, because God w...

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Romans 6

Romans 6

Erk Russell coached the George Southern football team from 1981-1989 and was known for his unconventional method of teaching his players. Once he asked some backwoods country farmers to bring a six-foot rattlesnake into one of their meetings and throw it on a table. As they did so, the players all scrambled for the door, and Russell said: "You should fear drugs as much as ...

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Romans 5

Romans 5

When the New Testament was written, there were several words the authors used that were unusual. One of them was the word agape, which means "love." The Greek language had several words for love, but this one was hardly ever employed in their literature. For example, Homer did not use it in the Iliad. Plato and Aristotle did not use it in their philosophical writings. And ...

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